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Posts Tagged ‘plotline’

Originally posted on October 6, 2010

Ever notice that each well-written book has one quote or an instance of narrative inside it that embodies the essence of that book?

I was skimming through some books, which I recently read/re-read, paying closer attention to the authors’ style and characterization techniques, and voice and the way they played with plots and sub-plots.

It is during this exercise that I realized what true talent it takes to be able to distill the whole plot, purpose and theme of a novel into just a few short, well-chosen bouquets of words.

Here are some true gems, spoken or narrated by the (a) main character in each of the books.

  • Julian smiled. “Not quite,” he said. “Let us say that I am as American as pizza pie. I did not originate here, but I am here to stay.”

                    — The View from Saturday, E.L.Konigsburg

  • He liked to forget he was Luke Garner, third child hidden in the attic.

                    — Among the Hidden, Margaret Peterson Haddix

  • “This case is as simple as black and white.”

                    — To Kill a Mockingbird, Harper Lee

  • His father thought. “No, I don’t think so. Of course the Elders are so careful in their observations and selections.”

                    — The Giver, Lois Lowry

  •  The rain is a cool kiss on my sleeve as I link my arm through hers. “We’re all damaged somehow.”

                    — A Great and Terrible Beauty, Libba Bray

  • “Ever since I was little,” Mullet Fingers said, “I’ve been watchin’ this place disappear – the piney woods, the scrub, the creeks, the glades. Even the beaches, man – they put up all these giant hotels and only goober tourists are allowed. It really sucks.”

                    — Hoot, Carl Hiaasen

  • I don’t make up lies for no reason. I just move the truth around a little when it gets in my way. What’s the big deal about that?

                    — Notes from a Liar and Her Dog, Gennifer Choldenko

  • “It’s less a matter of looking the other way than of closing our eyes to what we can’t stop from happening.”

                    — Memoirs of a Geisha, Arthur Golden

  • Finally, I’m a grown-up! Finally, I’m a child.

                    — Deliver Us from Normal, Kate Klise

  • “A woman’s place – our place, Roshan – is behind the veil, behind the zenana’s walls, and if you want to do anything at all, do it here, in this space. But,” Jahanara added, unable to be kind to a sister she did not like, “you can do little, Roshan, you are but a second daughter. Stay away from the jharoka.

                    — Shadow Princess, Indu Sundaresan

Do you have a favorite quote from a book?

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Ever notice that each well-written book has one quote or an instance of narrative inside it that embodies the essence of that book?

I was skimming through some books, which I recently read/re-read, paying closer attention to the authors’ style and characterization techniques, and voice and the way they played with plots and sub-plots.

It is during this exercise that I realized what true talent it takes to be able to distill the whole plot, purpose and theme of a novel into just a few short, well-chosen bouquets of words.

Here are some true gems, spoken or narrated by the (a) main character in each of the books.

  • Julian smiled. “Not quite,” he said. “Let us say that I am as American as pizza pie. I did not originate here, but I am here to stay.”

                    — The View from Saturday, E.L.Konigsburg

  • He liked to forget he was Luke Garner, third child hidden in the attic.

                    — Among the Hidden, Margaret Peterson Haddix

  • “This case is as simple as black and white.”

                    — To Kill a Mockingbird, Harper Lee

  • His father thought. “No, I don’t think so. Of course the Elders are so careful in their observations and selections.”

                    — The Giver, Lois Lowry

  •  The rain is a cool kiss on my sleeve as I link my arm through hers. “We’re all damaged somehow.”

                    — A Great and Terrible Beauty, Libba Bray

  • “Ever since I was little,” Mullet Fingers said, “I’ve been watchin’ this place disappear – the piney woods, the scrub, the creeks, the glades. Even the beaches, man – they put up all these giant hotels and only goober tourists are allowed. It really sucks.”

                    — Hoot, Carl Hiaasen

  • I don’t make up lies for no reason. I just move the truth around a little when it gets in my way. What’s the big deal about that?

                    — Notes from a Liar and Her Dog, Gennifer Choldenko

  • “It’s less a matter of looking the other way than of closing our eyes to what we can’t stop from happening.”

                    — Memoirs of a Geisha, Arthur Golden

  • Finally, I’m a grown-up! Finally, I’m a child.

                    — Deliver Us from Normal, Kate Klise

  • “A woman’s place – our place, Roshan – is behind the veil, behind the zenana’s walls, and if you want to do anything at all, do it here, in this space. But,” Jahanara added, unable to be kind to a sister she did not like, “you can do little, Roshan, you are but a second daughter. Stay away from the jharoka.

                    — Shadow Princess, Indu Sundaresan

 Do you have a favorite quote from a book?

Read Full Post »

You pick up a book at the library, because you read an excerpt about it somewhere. You’re very excited about reading it, because you can’t wait to see how the author has handled the plot, how she has sketched the characters, and how well she has balanced action and dialogue with description. And, that book is very close in genre and age-group to the one on which you’re currently working.

You come home and start reading it. Your heart begins to race, because whaddaya know? The book begins very similar to how yours does. Now, isn’t that amazing? You continue to breeze through the book and as you go on, your heart rate slows down until your heart begins to slowly plummet. Why? Because the book is telling your story!

That’s not fair! It was your brainchild. How dare someone else not only have the same idea, but execute it well ahead of you and publish it, too?

Has this (or something similar) happened to you? I’m sure as writers, every one of us has confronted something along these lines at one time or another.

What do you do when faced with such a debilitating experience?

You take a deep breath, shake your head, and finish reading that book. At the end you go: “A very good book, but I’m sure mine will be better.”

Writers are eternal optimists, if not anything else, especially when it comes to their stories and plotlines. Aren’t they?

They have to be, or they couldn’t proceed to put down their inner-most thoughts on paper day in and day out for everyone’s perusal, could they?

If you have faced such a situation, take heart! There are over six billion humans inhabiting this planet of ours. Isn’t it highly likely that any time you’re having a thought, at least one other person on this Earth is having the exact same thought (even if they may be thinking it in a language completely foreign to you?).

That is why many also opine that no story is ever completely original. There are only so many original ideas in the world, in human psyche at least, and every one of them has already been explored. So, whatever story you’re working on right now, you’re trying to tell one that has already been narrated; be it via the written word or by word of mouth.

So, what keeps your effort apart and makes it genuine? The fact that you are trying to tell the story in your own voice.

That is also why, even if there’s a book already out there with a plot line similar to yours, there’s nothing earth-shattering about it. Your book, when it’s done, will still be different from that one, because:

  • Not every twist in the book’s plot could be similar to those in yours
  • Your voice is your own, which makes your book different from every other one out there
  • Your character development is bound to take its own unique path
  • Your setting will have aspects that belong to you, your experiences, and your past and present, which makes it original in its own right

And look at the brightest fact of all:

If a book similar to the one that you’re writing has already been published, then it can only mean one thing…

There is an audience out there that is ready, with its appetite already whetted, for your book.

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